Astrophysics Seminar

Astrophysics Seminar: "Galaxy Evolution at the Peak Epoch of Cosmic Star Formation: Witnessing In-situ the Growth and Transformations of Young Galaxies"

Location: 
Kaplun building, Room No. 200
Tue, 24/05/2016 - 12:30 to 13:30

Lecturer: Dr. Natascha M. Forster Schreiber Affiliation: MPE Abstract: Eight to eleven billion years ago, galaxies were undergoing their most rapid mass assembly phase, forming stars at prodigious rates 10 to 20 times faster than observed today in the Milky Way and other nearby galaxies. While the statistical census of surveys measuring the global properties of faint distant galaxy populations and the fossil record from stars in present-day galaxies have enabled us to pin down when galaxies formed, detailed and resolved in-situ observations of individual

Astrophysics Seminar: "Hot Jupiters from alternative secular high-eccentricity migration scenarios"

Location: 
Kaplun building, Room No. 200
Sun, 29/01/2017 - 12:30 to 13:30

Lecturer: Dr. Adrian Hamers Affiliation: Princeton University Abstract: One of the proposed formation origins of hot Jupiters (HJs) is high-eccentricity (high-e) migration. In this case, the eccentricity of the orbit of a planet initially beyond the ice line is dynamically excited by a secular process, which leads to small periapse distances and strong tidal dissipation. An extensively-studied scenario of high-e migration involves an inclined and/or highly eccentric binary companion (star or massive planet). A major problem is that the predicted formation rates are too low

Astrophysics Seminar: "Probing unexplored exoplanet demographics with new microlensing campaigns"

Location: 
Kaplun building, Room No. 200
Tue, 01/11/2016 - 12:30 to 13:30

Lecturer: Dr. Yossi Shvartzvald Affiliation: NASA-JPL Abstract: Gravitational microlensing is unique in its ability to probe several relatively untapped reservoirs of exoplanet demographics, including planets near the "snowline," the Galactic distribution of exoplanets, and the population of free-floating planets. However, converting from the standard microlensing observables to the fundamental physical properties of the lensing system requires additional information beyond the basic microlensing light curve. In the past few years we have achieved significant