Astrophysics Seminar

Dr. Yuri Levin

Location: 
Kaplun Building, seminar room, 2nd floor
Tue, 06/12/2011 - 12:30 to 13:30

On Gravitational-wave detection by Pulsar Timing Arrays"

"High Energy Astrophysics Seminar: High-Energy Neutrinos as New Cosmic Messengers"

Location: 
Kaplun building, Room No. 200
Thu, 04/09/2014 - 13:00 to 14:00

Prof. Kohta MuraseIn, Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) Abstract: 2013, the IceCube collaboration reported 28 events of high-energy neutrino events. They are likely to contain extraterrestrial signals, and it is the dawn of a new age of neutrino astrophysics. In this talk, I try to demystify the origin of the observed neutrino signals. I discuss various astrophysical possibilities, and then demonstrate the power of the multi-messenger approach to reveal the origin.

Dr. Ravit Helled, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, Tel-Aviv University

Location: 
Kaplun building, Room No. 200
Tue, 17/06/2014 - 12:30 to 13:30

"Planet Formation At Large Radial Distances": Direct imagining has revealed the existence of planets at tens of AU from their parent stars. This, together with current and future detections of planets at intermediate and large radial distances can impact significantly our understating of planets by shedding light on an unexplored region of planetary systems.

Prof. Dr. Romain Tesyssier

Location: 
Kaplun Building, seminar room, 2nd floor
Wed, 07/12/2011 - 14:00 to 17:00

Subject: "The Vlassov-Poisson equation, the Euler-Poisson equations and beyond" Subject: "Numerical methods for self-gravitating magnetized fluid dynamics"

"Astrophysics Seminar: Dwarfs galaxies in the Local Group: insights and unresolved issues"

Location: 
Kaplun building, Room No. 200
Tue, 18/11/2014 - 12:30 to 13:30

Lecturer: Dr. Noam Libeskind Affiliation: Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam Abstract: Dwarf galaxies are the smallest yet most abundant cosmological objects in existence. Yet owing to their low luminosity, they can only be seen in the immediate neighborhood of the Milky Way, a region known as the Local Group. Observations of these galaxies can help us understand key aspects of the Local Group including the nature of dark matter, our place in the cosmos, and how our specific corner of the universe is embedded in the large scale structure that surrounds us. Most of these

Prof. Alexander Vilenkin, Institute of Cosmology at Tuft University

Location: 
Kaplun building, Room No. 200
Tue, 20/05/2014 - 12:30 to 13:30

"Global structure of the multiverse and the measure problem": Cosmic inflation is generically a never ending process, with new "bubble universes" constantly being formed. I will discuss the origin of this "multiverse" worldview, its possible observational tests, and one of its major unresolved problems -- the so-called "measure problem".

Prof. Dr. Romain

Location: 
Kaplun Building, seminar room, 2nd floor
Sun, 11/12/2011 - 12:00 to 14:30

Subject: "Cosmological simulations with the RAMSES code (plus a comparison to SPH and AREPO)" Subject: "The physics of galaxy formation in brief"